#332 restoration (ongoing)

Here you can publish nice photos not tied to any specific subject. Other photos are preferrable published together with the text in the other subforums.
User avatar
prjacobs
Posts: 226
Joined: Fri Oct 12, 2012 4:06 pm

Re: #332 restoration (ongoing)

Post by prjacobs » Wed Oct 23, 2013 3:46 pm

I used WEST systems, thickened with coloidal silika from WEST.. It's important to brush a little unthickened epoxy on before applying the thickened stuff to makes sure you get a full contact for bonding. I squeezed in as much thickened epoxy as possible before putting in the plugs. As the filler block was right at the edge of my holes the plugs should now be "one" with the block.

Bob, your boat must have been built on a Monday :) With the exception of the above mentioned blocks, I've found the backing material, wiring conduits, etc pretty much where they're shown on the drawing.

There is a wealth of information in the drawings on this site Thank you Ballad Klub e.V. Deutsche Klassenvereinigung.
The drawing showing the block is the first one at the top of the page, titled "Ballad-58864.pdf". In the drawing it shows block #4 as being 300mm aft of the hatch opening. My blocks were only 200mm aft.

Bob McGovern
Posts: 279
Joined: Fri Oct 26, 2012 3:08 am
Location: Wyoming, USA

Re: #332 restoration (ongoing)

Post by Bob McGovern » Wed Oct 23, 2013 4:11 pm

Yep. Although that one does appear in the Handbook, running diagonally from port side of the companionway to a split between the salon lights, then stbd of the mast opening. You almost can't miss cutting it if installing a deck hatch behind the mast. There's also a conduit running up the starboard side of the companionway; both it and its port side mate run right through the places you would mount coachroof winches -- where the Handbook diagram claims there is 'pressure-resistant' deck core, but isn't (not on our boat).

I managed to cut both those conduits, too. :lol: It's a gift I have, hitting buried or overhead wires, water lines, etc. Dowsing, for idiots.;) Oh well -- we're totally re-thinking the electrical anyhow.

Also discovered the raised spray deflector -- that famous and beautiful curve that starts at the coamings and meets the sea hood/sliding hatch -- is filled with what looks like resin + coarse sand. Might be glass beads; looks like sand. Rough on drill bits, either way.

Peter: Ours was apparently an early Ballad -- we don't have the bronze plate (darn it) telling us what hull number, but the genoa & sailbag bear the number 18, if that means anything. Might be Albin was still figuring things out. The resin 'plugs' for the shroud eyebolts they missed with the drill, 5 times out of 6. :lol:

Have you used WEST System's Six10, at all? It's a caulk tube with pre-thickened, low-temp epoxy in it. Just tried some for a door repair last week: amazing stuff, and absurdly convenient for smaller repairs or hardware backing. You can buy the special dispensing tips, or just squirt some on a piece of cardboard & stir.

User avatar
dahlke
Posts: 111
Joined: Mon Jul 15, 2013 5:20 pm
Location: Randers, Denmark

Re: #332 restoration (ongoing)

Post by dahlke » Wed Oct 23, 2013 6:18 pm

prjacobs wrote:I used WEST systems, thickened with coloidal silika from WEST.. It's important to brush a little unthickened epoxy on before applying the thickened stuff to makes sure you get a full contact for bonding. I squeezed in as much thickened epoxy as possible before putting in the plugs. As the filler block was right at the edge of my holes the plugs should now be "one" with the block.

Bob, your boat must have been built on a Monday :) With the exception of the above mentioned blocks, I've found the backing material, wiring conduits, etc pretty much where they're shown on the drawing.

There is a wealth of information in the drawings on this site Thank you Ballad Klub e.V. Deutsche Klassenvereinigung.
The drawing showing the block is the first one at the top of the page, titled "Ballad-58864.pdf". In the drawing it shows block #4 as being 300mm aft of the hatch opening. My blocks were only 200mm aft.
Thanks, Peter :) Sounds like it's a good and easy "first-time-playing-with-epoxy"-job. I had a peak inside the holes today. One of them is not backed by anything - neither foam or wood. Good thing you warned me :)

Image
Mads
Ballad #332 (aka. Obelix)
Restoration blog
Boat and restoration pictures

User avatar
prjacobs
Posts: 226
Joined: Fri Oct 12, 2012 4:06 pm

Re: #332 restoration (ongoing)

Post by prjacobs » Thu Oct 24, 2013 5:54 am

Bob McGovern wrote: Have you used WEST System's Six10, at all? It's a caulk tube with pre-thickened, low-temp epoxy in it. Just tried some for a door repair last week: amazing stuff, and absurdly convenient for smaller repairs or hardware backing. You can buy the special dispensing tips, or just squirt some on a piece of cardboard & stir.
Thanks for the tip Bob. I have heard of 'Six10' but never used it. It sounds like something i should keep in my repair kit on board.

User avatar
dahlke
Posts: 111
Joined: Mon Jul 15, 2013 5:20 pm
Location: Randers, Denmark

Re: #332 restoration (ongoing)

Post by dahlke » Thu Oct 24, 2013 11:54 am

I decided to use WEST System's Six10 just to play around with it :)

Image
Image
Image
Mads
Ballad #332 (aka. Obelix)
Restoration blog
Boat and restoration pictures

User avatar
prjacobs
Posts: 226
Joined: Fri Oct 12, 2012 4:06 pm

Re: #332 restoration (ongoing)

Post by prjacobs » Thu Oct 24, 2013 4:05 pm

Nice job. Makes me wonder how many other Ballads have misplaced blocking in that area. i don't think it's a safety hazard, but it would make getting a good watertight seal at the bolts difficult. And the repair you did is pretty much hidden by the aluminum angle brackets.

Bob McGovern
Posts: 279
Joined: Fri Oct 26, 2012 3:08 am
Location: Wyoming, USA

Re: #332 restoration (ongoing)

Post by Bob McGovern » Thu Oct 24, 2013 4:41 pm

prjacobs wrote: Thanks for the tip Bob. I have heard of 'Six10' but never used it. It sounds like something i should keep in my repair kit on board.
Definitely an item for the repair kit.:) I love the mixing wands (dispensing tips), tho as Mads demonstrates they are optional. You can buy two spares in a poybag for about $4 USD. The tube has an inner plug and a screw-on cap so you can save the unused portion. What's so impressive is the viscosity: it's hugely thixotropic, so it comes out thin and stays thin as long as you keep it moving. As soon as the tooling stops --BAM! -- it thickens and does not sag or run. So for pressure-injecting into cracks or deck hardware holes, it's brilliant. You do not need to use neat epoxy to wet out the hole, drain it, thicken, and inject the thick stuff. One and done. I'm in love.

Mads: nice work on the repair. Forward progress is good! :mrgreen:

User avatar
dahlke
Posts: 111
Joined: Mon Jul 15, 2013 5:20 pm
Location: Randers, Denmark

Re: #332 restoration (ongoing)

Post by dahlke » Sun Oct 27, 2013 4:32 pm

The repair ended up looking pretty good :) Feels good knowing that there is proper support for the bolts. Thanks Peter :)
Image

I have started gluing the few pieces of plywood I test-fitted before I started painting. Gorilla glue was all had handy. Should work just fine. The darker areas are just water - not glue.
Image

Tomorrow Obelix (my ballad) and I can apparently look forward to winds up to 28 s/m (54 knots) according to the weather forecast. A quick "before picture" in case something goes horribly wrong ;) I'm not overly concerned. The 28 s/m are properly along the west coast and I live in the small town on the east coast - additionally we are surrounded by large hills and forest.
Image
Mads
Ballad #332 (aka. Obelix)
Restoration blog
Boat and restoration pictures

Bob McGovern
Posts: 279
Joined: Fri Oct 26, 2012 3:08 am
Location: Wyoming, USA

Re: #332 restoration (ongoing)

Post by Bob McGovern » Sun Oct 27, 2013 5:26 pm

Eek. Predicting 35kts here today, tho unseasonably warm temperatures. Might get one more work day in before winter! I glued proper core blocks under the chainplate bolts yesterday, then cast raised pads for the new ones. You can see in the first photo how the aft lowers ovalized their holes, due to poor load path and mis-placed (or mis-drilled) core reinforcement.

Image

Image

User avatar
prjacobs
Posts: 226
Joined: Fri Oct 12, 2012 4:06 pm

Re: #332 restoration (ongoing)

Post by prjacobs » Mon Oct 28, 2013 4:06 am

Mads,
I'm not a big fan of Gorilla glue. I had some problems while building a dinghy where joints sprung apart while under tension. I also don't like some of the ingredients listed on the Data Sheet, including "iphenyl methane-diisocyanate".

My glue of choice for the interior joinery was Titebond III. It's non-toxic and cleans up with water. When trying to separate two pieces glued together the wood always failed before the joint. However, it's not "gap filling" like the foaming glues and one's joints must be well crafted to form a proper bond. Where a good fit isn't possible thickened epoxy always does the trick.

Post Reply