#332 restoration (ongoing)

Here you can publish nice photos not tied to any specific subject. Other photos are preferrable published together with the text in the other subforums.
User avatar
dahlke
Posts: 111
Joined: Mon Jul 15, 2013 5:20 pm
Location: Randers, Denmark

Re: #332 restoration (ongoing)

Post by dahlke » Mon Oct 28, 2013 5:47 am

prjacobs wrote:Mads,
I'm not a big fan of Gorilla glue. I had some problems while building a dinghy where joints sprung apart while under tension. I also don't like some of the ingredients listed on the Data Sheet, including "iphenyl methane-diisocyanate".

My glue of choice for the interior joinery was Titebond III. It's non-toxic and cleans up with water. When trying to separate two pieces glued together the wood always failed before the joint. However, it's not "gap filling" like the foaming glues and one's joints must be well crafted to form a proper bond. Where a good fit isn't possible thickened epoxy always does the trick.
Ugh, that currently doesn't sound good. I've ordered some Titebond III :)
Mads
Ballad #332 (aka. Obelix)
Restoration blog
Boat and restoration pictures

User avatar
dahlke
Posts: 111
Joined: Mon Jul 15, 2013 5:20 pm
Location: Randers, Denmark

Re: #332 restoration (ongoing)

Post by dahlke » Mon Oct 28, 2013 6:01 am

Bob McGovern wrote:Eek. Predicting 35kts here today, tho unseasonably warm temperatures. Might get one more work day in before winter! I glued proper core blocks under the chainplate bolts yesterday, then cast raised pads for the new ones. You can see in the first photo how the aft lowers ovalized their holes, due to poor load path and mis-placed (or mis-drilled) core reinforcement.
I can see how it would be difficult to get at watertight seal around such a large and uneven hole. Judging by the pictures I've seen it seems like you have had most of the inside fiberglass removed by now. :)

If I'm lucky i'll have a couple of weeks before winter sets in.
Mads
Ballad #332 (aka. Obelix)
Restoration blog
Boat and restoration pictures

Bob McGovern
Posts: 279
Joined: Fri Oct 26, 2012 3:08 am
Location: Wyoming, USA

Re: #332 restoration (ongoing)

Post by Bob McGovern » Mon Oct 28, 2013 5:41 pm

I mucked around with polyurethane glues when starting out as a woodworker. Quickly decided they are not worth the fuss. Messy, expensive, short shelf life after opening, require moisture to cure properly, do not sand or take color well. The foam 'fills gaps' but not with any strength. They are slippery, making it hard to clamp parts accurately (poor initial tack), and they have very long clamp times. Also, GG is guilty of terrible hype about strength, applicability, and waterproofness. Many of their marketing claims have been debunked. It's a good glue, but not the answer for all things. What you are using it for is perfect, tho.:)

Another adhesive worth having around is 5 minute epoxy. It's far more brittle than WEST epoxy, not as waterproof, and perhaps 1/3 the ultimate strength, but it is really useful for small, non-load-bearing repairs. Filling old interior screw and bolt holes, setting plugs, tacking wood blocks onto the hull for wire harnesses, etc. In the US, Devcon sells syringes that dispense both parts in equal measure. You can tint it with a dab of oil colors to blend with damaged woodwork.

User avatar
dahlke
Posts: 111
Joined: Mon Jul 15, 2013 5:20 pm
Location: Randers, Denmark

Re: #332 restoration (ongoing)

Post by dahlke » Sun Dec 01, 2013 1:44 pm

Yay for global warming ;) We've only had a few days with temperatures below freezing so fare. Due to the warm weather I've had time to do the final test fitting of the new plywood. All the plywood has been sanded and is ready for paint. Current plan is to paint all the plywood white (same color as the bulkheads). All mahogany and teak will be varnished. I hope it's not going to be "too" white.

Image

Image

Image
Mads
Ballad #332 (aka. Obelix)
Restoration blog
Boat and restoration pictures

Bob McGovern
Posts: 279
Joined: Fri Oct 26, 2012 3:08 am
Location: Wyoming, USA

Re: #332 restoration (ongoing)

Post by Bob McGovern » Sun Dec 01, 2013 7:10 pm

Looks great! If it is too white when everything is done, you can always add more wood, some fabrics, etc. until it reaches the right balance.

User avatar
prjacobs
Posts: 226
Joined: Fri Oct 12, 2012 4:06 pm

Re: #332 restoration (ongoing)

Post by prjacobs » Mon Dec 02, 2013 4:26 pm

Great job! You're making good progress. Those pictures look strangely familiar :D

User avatar
dahlke
Posts: 111
Joined: Mon Jul 15, 2013 5:20 pm
Location: Randers, Denmark

Re: #332 restoration (ongoing)

Post by dahlke » Sun Feb 23, 2014 8:36 pm

Today and tomorrow the weather forecast promises temperatures between 5 C and 10 C. I decided to take advantage and do a bit of fiberglass work. In hindsight I should have cut the strips of glass a little wider. I'm planning to let it cure and add some more layers. How many layers should I aim for (did 5 layers of 200g Bi-directional glass today)?

Still very much a newbie when it comes to fiberglass :-)

Before
Image

After (I used the old shelf to keep the bulkhead in place.)
Image
Last edited by dahlke on Mon Mar 24, 2014 5:48 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Mads
Ballad #332 (aka. Obelix)
Restoration blog
Boat and restoration pictures

User avatar
dahlke
Posts: 111
Joined: Mon Jul 15, 2013 5:20 pm
Location: Randers, Denmark

Re: #332 restoration (ongoing)

Post by dahlke » Mon Mar 24, 2014 5:45 pm

A quick update :)

Installed the new LED lighting (and a fancy new lightswitch). Installed a blackjack (stern gland). Removed the old thru-hulls and seacocks with exception of the one used for seawater to the engine. I'm going to use thru-hulls and seacocks from Trudesign Plastics.


Image

Image

Image

Image
Mads
Ballad #332 (aka. Obelix)
Restoration blog
Boat and restoration pictures

User avatar
dahlke
Posts: 111
Joined: Mon Jul 15, 2013 5:20 pm
Location: Randers, Denmark

Re: #332 restoration (ongoing)

Post by dahlke » Tue Apr 08, 2014 8:42 pm

I'm basically done with the forward half of the boat :) I do however still need to build a holding tank. The biggest problem right now is finding PVC "pluming" pipes and fittings. I'm having a hard time finding anything that will allow me to connect my 38 mm hose to the holding tank.

I had planed on insulating the hull before putting the interior back together. Sadly it needs to be +18C for me to use the recommended glue. My new plan is to finish putting the interior together the next couple of weeks. Later this summer I will need to take some of it apart again in order to insulate.

I've placed an order for some new cooling hose (and an EPIRB). As soon as the hose arrives I hope I will be able to get the engine started. Very exiting - and a bit frightening.

Interior
Image

Image

The new sprayhood from vegamarine arrived last week.
Image

I know it's a silly little task but I cleaned my diesel tank (inside and outside) - what a difference :)
Image
Image
Mads
Ballad #332 (aka. Obelix)
Restoration blog
Boat and restoration pictures

Bob McGovern
Posts: 279
Joined: Fri Oct 26, 2012 3:08 am
Location: Wyoming, USA

Re: #332 restoration (ongoing)

Post by Bob McGovern » Tue Apr 08, 2014 9:31 pm

I polished the barbeque grill. *sigh* Looking good, Mads. Good you have some decent weather to work in. Today and tomorrow are the first above-freezing days this whole year, and the winds are blowing 40mph. I may start dorade work, anyhow.

For the holding tank: you can find nylon (Delrin?) tank/bulkhead fitting, usually with barbs, and many hardware or marine stores. Same idea as this:

Image

These extend some distance into the tank and secure to the tank using a ring. Downsides are difficulty sealing, risk of ring backing off, and tank won't drain completely. Cutting off the excess spigot inside can reduce the projection, but unless you put the outlet in a sump, there will always be 2cm of sewage in the bottom of the tank.

A lower-profile and more secure option puts the retaining ring on the outside of the tank:

Image

Easier to get a good seal and to re-tighten if needed. These are also sold as thru-hull outlet fittings for bilge pumps, like this:

Image

You could also install a two-piece bulkhead fitting with internal threads, then install a hose barb into that, but that's bulky and complicated.

The simplest, strongest, and most leak-proof alternative is to glass a permanent outlet nipple right into your tank. You can use fiberglass tube or PVC pipe, roughed up with sandpaper. The key is a smooth lower section for the hose to clamp to and a generous amount of filleting and taping where the pipe exits the tank. You want to prevent any sideways forces from levering the pipe out. That's how your rudder tube and engine shaft log are constructed: a tube glassed onto the hull.

Post Reply